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20121117
20121117
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
probably the worst hurricanes in the gulf coast in the last 40 years: ivan, dennis, katrina. and katrina i was the commander of the medical forces in pensacola, florida, and i owned the branch clinics that existed in new orleans, pascagula and gulf port, mississippi. we thought we had dodged the bullet and then the levies broke and who would have predicted that there was a sea of humanity in the super dome that basically was in extreme miss? who would have predicted in this day and age we would lose many, many people based on the fact they couldn't be medevacked, that the hospitals themselves had been flooded and the hospital staff was having to carry critically ill patients up to the top floors to avoid the water that was filling in the rooms. who would have predicted that? and were we set up to handle that? and who would have predicted in the early goings there would be civic disorder and civic disobedience and lack of command and control and then the military came there and provided that stability for a while until the civic authorities took over and eventually got things moving in
after hurricane katrina, which we all know will be probably the greatest civil engineering set of blunders that our country has made in our country's history. and what we all learn from hurricane katrina is what happens when we don't have a community that is prepared and a set of relationships that is ready to be hit by the big one. which leads me to the third reason why i wake up at night. the neighborhoods that i represent in the northeast not only represent the oldest neighborhoods in our city, but some of the most vulnerable. we have some of the poorest residents. half of my district are recent immigrants who are mono lingual. i have hundreds of constituents who live in buildings that contain them where they live three, four, five people in a room that might be no larger than 10 by 15 feet, in buildings that are absolutely prone to earthquake, fire, and the next major disaster. and, so, i was asked to just mention if i had three things that i want you to tell us as your civilian leaders. the first has to do with how to deal with community shock. two nights ago as a couple o
it in policy over the years and certainly things have advanced since 9/11 and hurricane katrina, but there has been a real gap in detailed preplanning for emergency response, particularly as it works its way down the chain into the tactical forces that would respond, most specifically i think those on active duty. this is an area that we don't tend to pay a lot of attention to and very often when it comes we tray to look the other way. i believe that we have been reasonably responsive in immediate response, immediate response by doctrine and policy are military dod authorities moving out their gates into their neighborhoods when a disaster hits right next door. i mean, that seems to make sense. we have good relationships at our bases and stations and the ability to roll out and assist is something you would expect to work out pretty well. some of that has matured, in fact. in the state of california we have established a number of agreements, most particularly the wildfires where both third fleet and the expeditionary force assign helicopters in the need we are requested, it's pre-planned, o
thing in katrina you have a whole bunch of cars taken off the market because they're not usable and all of a sudden used car prices go up, 10, 20, saw them up 20% reported last week and all the way across, diesel oil. we're going to see it across the state it's not just a northeast issue. >> brenda: gary k, what do you think of that? >> toby is absolutely right. whenever you have shortages with an event like this, especially in highly populated area, lumber, building materials, we can run the gamut here. prices go higher and costs go higher to business and consumers and that will definitively effect an economy. especially still trying to get up. a very tough thing to watch. >> brenda: gary b. is it having an impact or limited and temporary? >> the latter brenda, yes. look, it's the less, less temporary and less limited, i think the closer you were to the northeast. so, people obviously on long island, new jersey are going to feel it the most in spikes in prices and people in california feel it less. toby makes a very good point about insurance rates, but i think back to katrina and i di
and i were down at katrina right after it happened and one of the issues, you know, there were many medical issues. one was pharmaceuticals. did you discuss in this pharmaceuticals and how you would get your pharmaceuticals? >> we didn't specifically discuss it. we did i think in the shock trauma platoon know about what medications are carried on the c130, what medications were available. during the hhs presentation there was talk about the large manufacturers, if there were problems getting medications, that the federal government could facilitate that. but it is a great point. it's something locally we are working on with our pharmaceutical group because it is a big concern if we do lose supply how do we replenish that. san francisco does not have a lot of storage space so we are not able to store medications to a great extent in the area. >> i was just going to echo, our capability does come with its own internal pharmaceutical supply, although it is limited and so that would be important for us to understand what the resupply process would be as we move forward on that. so
lists of policies and often their wish lists of policies, after hurricane katrina there was a meeting at the heritage foundation just two weeks after the storm hit. parts of the city were still under water and there was a meeting and "the wall street journal" reported from it and the heading was 31 free market solutions for hurricane katrina and you go down the list and it was -- don't re-open the public schools. replace the public schools with vouchers and drill for oil in anwar and the arctic national wild life reserve and what kind of free market solutions are these? here you have a crisis that was created by a collision between heavy weather which may or may not have been linked to climate change and what climate change looks like and colliding with weak infrastructure because of years and years of neglect. let's get rid of the infrastructural together and drill for the oil which is the root cause of climate change. that's their shock doctrine, and i think it's time for people shock. >> people shock? >> which we've had before, if you think about 1929 and the market shock and the w
on the show during katrina a long island church sent aid to louisiana and now the favor is being returned. >> and millions spent to it set up food stamp application sites. wait until you hear how much. based on this chart ? don't rush into it, i'm not looking for the fastest answer. obviously verizon. okay, i have a different chart. going that way, does that make a difference ? look at verizon. it's so much more than the other ones. so what if we just changed the format altogether ? isn't that the exact same thing ? it's pretty clear. still sticking with verizon. verizon. more 4g lte coverage than all other networks combined. aww, nowell, i'll do the shoppi. if you do the shipping. shipping's a hassle. i'll go to the mall. hey. hi. you know, holiday shipping's easy with priority mail flat rate boxes from the postal service. if it fits, it ships anywhere in the country for low flat rate. yea, i know. oh, you're good. good luck! priority mail flat rate boxes. online pricing starts at $5.15. only from the postal service. can you help me with something? nope! good talk. [ male announcer ] or
francisco to advance our lifeline's resilence we are the first major u.s. city to (inaudible) post katrina where he saw firsthand where a critical role these systems played in the city's recovery. i am honored to chair the council because i feel it's crucial that the public sector work side by side with our private sector partners to do everything we can today to ensure we will meet the needs of our residents in the days, weeks and years after a disaster. the objective of the lifeline council are to develop and improve collaboration in the city and county across regions regularly -- to develop and improve collaboration in the city and across the region by regularly convening a group of senior level operation officers of local and regional life line providers, understanding intersystem dependencies of enhancing planning, restoration and reconstruction, share information about the recovery plans and priorities and establish coordination process for life lines restoration and recovery following a major disaster. i'm going to go back to the last slide and just say today's conversation i want
on those contingencies. but we look at the national response framework. it was rewritten post katrina. and another key part of partnerships, when i was the federal on scene coordinator during deep water horizon, it's not in the national response framework, but every parish president, every mayor, every governor had a coast guard liaison officer at the oak pride and above level. so, if they didn't like how the response was going, go to my liaison officer. don't go to anderson cooper and then cause the white house to react to what they're seeing on cnn. so, how do you get in front of that news cycle? and the only way you can do that as tip o'neill said, all things in politics are local and i think we heard from vice admiral nathan that i think all responses are local as well. and, so, we really need to start most importantly at the local level, at those planning levels, because the first shot of any campaign, the plan will change, but the partnerships need to remain constant. >> and, general baldwin, we heard from colonel span owe about now your three hats of authority, your state hat,
of the l.a. riots that were highlighted during hurricane katrina, we had two milltrix out there, the active force and responding. with changes in the law and changes in focus and direction we're starting to fix a lot of that and come together as one joint team to be able to better serve the people here in the state of california and the rest the nation in times of disaster. but there is work that needs to be done. first, we need to find a way that we can share capabilities that are resident within each of our organizations. as the commander of the army national guard you would think i know what forces are available in the army reserve in california. but i don't. i don't even know who their general officers are. i have no visibility on what forces are available at camp pendleton depending on your deployment cycle what fleet week can bring to bear. and we need to find a way, perhaps dcl, north palm being the broker of that, to maintain a better capabilities database so we know what is immediately available because under our old constructs, if we needed additional help in the national guard in
disaster yet. we have had disasters, i was in katrina on an urban search and rescue team, i've been in pretty much all major engagements as far as wild land fires in california, but if you look at a global disaster perspective where you have a hundred thousand victims like a tsunami or a large scale event, we have yet to experience that in this nation. i think the agreements we have here today and the relationships we develop today are going to be key to mitigate that. the other scenario that we are concerned with is a coordinated aerial incendiary attack by al qaeda. one of the things we've seen already in the european union is suspect of al qaeda starting fires in the eu if that happened in california in the right weather conditions, it would be disasterous and everybody in this room would likely be involved. but to go back, it's all -- for me it's all about relationships, it's all about communication and respecting each other's mission. we certainly appreciate our relationships with all 3 agencies up here. the last thing i would say with respect to technology, one of the thin
're talking about a bailout for fema, a bailout after katrina and never paid that back and whatever, 16 billion, the post office lost 16 billion. federal housing administration. >> neil: 16 billion. >> that's a common thing, 16 billion, 16 billion, the number later on. >> a combination. >> neil: and after 16, after 16. >> and listen, of course, they have to find places to stay, it was pretty tight, but it doesn't feel right. i use today stay at the soho grand and when i had more money before the first stock market crash and-- >> a very nice place. >> neil: adam, you clearly feel guilty? >> well, because in fact, i stayed at the soho grand last month and i have to say, i didn't think it was that plush, neil, actually and of course they have-- >> plush? >> that's a great place, man. >> and compared so the some of the other hotels at midtown. >> and hilton gardens inns and marriott residence inns and we're piling on fema which of course has problems and needs to be improved. and this is fun. it's a beautiful picture of the hotel. >> neil: you know, it does come at a time they're asking for
. >> well, i mean, you know, we had hurricane sandy which disrupted the economy for a period. we had katrina many years ago. things will disrupt the economy. i mean, 9/11 was extraordinary case. but we have a very resilient economy. we had one for hundreds of years and the fact that they can't get along for the month of january is not going to torpedo the economy. >> buffett also told me that the president and congress need to make every attempt possible to reach a compromise and he also said that does not mean that qua yoet roll over and give away the store." again, he wants to see the president take a hard line here. the big part of these negotiate azs is taxes on the wealthy. should tax rates increase or not. we ask buffet for specifics when it comes to taxes, especially taxes on investments or capital gains taxes. here's what he told us. >> we certainly, we certainly prosperred with capital gains rates more than double what they are currently. >> we'd be fine with 30% capital gains. >> sure. >> what about income tax? >> income taxes as high as 90% during my lifetime. now, very few people
of hurricane katrina. that's trouble for roughly 100% of re-elected presidents since 1972. yes, it's enough to give you second thoughts about that second term. so is there anything the obama team can do to prevent this? now, as bill clinton might say. >> it depends upon what the meaning of the word "is" is. >> reporter: the fact is, if there is going to be a second-term scandal, its seeds were probably sewn in the first term. the watergate break-in, nixon's first term. the actual iran contra deal, reagan's first term. bill clinton's liaison with lewinsky, first term. the actual plame leaks, first term. so if the obama team was going to mess up, history suggests, they already did. maybe it's something that has made headlines already, but maybe not. remember, the lewinsky scandal didn't surface until 1998. maybe the obama administration will make its own history and avoid a second-term scandal. but if not, disney world may seem very appealing. you know, it was interesting, in the president's news conference, he said he was well aware of the history of presidential overreach in second terms. t
the next time a storm like sandy or katrina hits. >> we can go where nobody else can go. give the guys a bunch of fuel, turn them loose and let them go save some people. having you ship my gifts couldn't be easier. well, having a ton of locations doesn't hurt. and my daughter loves the santa. oh, ah sir. that is a customer. let's not tell mom. [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. fedex office. olaf's pizza palace gets the most rewards of any small business credit card! pizza!!!!! [ garth ] olaf's small business earns 2% cash back on every purchase, every day! helium delivery. put it on my spark card! [ pop! ] [ garth ] why settle for less? great businesses deserve the most rewards! awesome!!! [ male announcer ] the spark business card from capital one. choose unlimited rewards with 2% cash back or double miles on every purchase, every day! what's in your wallet? [ gordon ] for some this line is a convenience. how you doing today? i'm good thanks. how are you? i'm good. [ gordon ] but for others, it's all they can afford. every day nearly nine million older americans don't
believes that. >> well, we had hurricane sandy which disrupted the economy for a period. we had katrina many years ago. there are things that will disrupt the economy. 9/11 was an extraordinary case, but we have a very resilient economy. we've had one for hundreds of years. and the fact that they can't get along for the month of january is not going to torpedo the economy. >> of course, we also discussed taxes. warren buffett has been out front, talking about how he believes wealthy americans should pay more in maxes. we wanted to know how much more, specifically when it comes to capital gains taxes. >> we prospers with capital gains rates more than double what they are currently. >> we would be fine with 30 pest capital gains? >> sure. >> what about income taxes? >> they were revised 90% in my lifetime. very few people got up there, but i saw lots of people paying federal tax rates of 50%. and they went to work every day. >> so at this point, there's no level you're -- >> i think they could be significantly higher. >> that puts warren buffett at odds with many other ceos who argue if y
it was katrina or other events we've actually been able to bring in national guard platforms to provide 911 systems for cities that have lost those systems. we recently in the joplin tornados and also tuscaloosa tornados we brought in dod equipment to replace what was destroyed. from the fire side i know there's a lot of things you are doing to work around the interoperatability issues with regard to communications between fire and dod and maybe if ray or anybody else wants to speak to that. >> our communications challenges still exist. we have excellent telecom communications, we have a layered effect of our radio systems. we have mobile command posts that we can exercise. so we're prepared for power outages, reduction of telecoms, we have a layered effect for our communications. but as everybody here said, we need help. if somebody here can help me get a navy or marine corps aircraft to talk to my guys on the ground tactically, i need that and i don't have that today. i use a command control helicopter, a civilian helicopter, to handle that and transfer that to an air to air victor
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)